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Rhinegeist Truth Clone Recipe

Disclaimer: While searching for a good IPA recipe, I discovered the following on a forum online. I am not claiming authorship of the recipe below. If the forum post I read is factual, and I have no reason to think it isn't, this recipe includes input from one of the Rhinegeist brewmasters. That means it probably can produce a beer very close to the original. I plan to brew it at some point to see how it turns out. For now, I'm just documenting and sharing the recipe here.

Update 06/11/2017:  I've actually tweaked the recipe for my equipment and brewed a batch, following as much of the brewmaster's guidance as possible.  You can see the results here.

Ingredients

8.5 pounds of Rahr Pale Malt (67.3%)
2.75 pounds of Golden Promise Malt (19.5%)
12 ounces of Briess Vienna Malt (5.3%)
10 ounces of Carared Malt (4.4%)
8 ounces of Flaked Rye (3.5%)
0.65 ounces of Bravo hops pellets @ 15.0% AA (60 minutes)
0.71 ounces of Centennial hops pellets @ 10% AA (20 minutes)
0.30 ounces of Simcoe hops pellets @ 10% AA (20 minutes)
1.10 ounces of Centennial hops pellets @ 10% AA (10 minutes)
0.25 ounces of Simcoe hops pellets @ 13% AA (10 minutes)
2 ounces of Centennial hops pellets @ 10% AA (0 minutes)
1.5 ounces of Simcoe hops pellets @ 13% AA (0 minutes)
1 ounce of Citra hops pellets @ 12% AA (0 minutes)
2 ounces of Amarillo hops pellets @ 9.2% AA (dry hop 7 days)
1.5 ounces of Simcoe hops pellets @ 13% AA (dry hop 7 days)
1 ounce of Citra hops pellets @ 12% AA (dry hop 7 days)
1 Tbsp. Irish Moss
1.5 Liter starter of San Diego Super Yeast (WLP090)

Notes from the Rhinegeist brewmaster say that they use 20% Golden Promise malt, 2% CaraRed, 4% Flaked Rye, and 5% Vienna and mash at 150F. The brewmaster also says that they hop with 30 IBUs worth of Bravo at 60 minutes, 20 IBUs of a 2:1 mix of Centennial and Simcoe at 20 minutes, and 16 IBUs worth of a 2:1 mixture of Centennial and Simcoe at 10 minutes. At 0 minutes they and Centennial, Simcoe, and Citra then steep for 45 minutes before cooling. They dry hop with Amarillo, Simcoe, and Citra for 7-8 days. They suggest you shoot for a starting gravity of 15 Plato or 1.061 SG, and try to attenuate down to 1.9 Plato or 1.007 SG.

Mash

Mash with 8 gallons of water for 90 minutes @ 150F. Raise to 170F over 7 minutes for mash out.

Boil

Boil for 60 minutes with the hops scheduled as noted above.

Perform a hop stand by turning off the heat but waiting for 45 minutes to cool the wort after the boil.

Fermentation Schedule

Ferment at 65F for 3 days.

Ramp from 65F to 70F over 4 days.

Add dry hops on day 7.

Cold crash with a gelatin addition for 3 days.



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